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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 827621, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/827621
Review Article

Class A -Lactamases as Versatile Scaffolds to Create Hybrid Enzymes: Applications from Basic Research to Medicine

1Laboratory of Enzymology and Protein Folding, Centre for Protein Engineering, Institute of Chemistry, University of Liege, (Sart-Tilman) 4000 Liege, Belgium
2ProGenosis, Boulevard du Rectorat, 27b-B22, (Sart-Tilman) 4000 Liege, Belgium
3Laboratory of Biological Macromolecules, Centre for Protein Engineering, Institute of Chemistry, University of Liege, (Sart-Tilman) 4000 Liege, Belgium

Received 31 May 2013; Accepted 4 July 2013

Academic Editor: Bidur Prasad Chaulagain

Copyright © 2013 Céline Huynen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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