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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 839761, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/839761
Review Article

Role of NADPH Oxidase-Mediated Reactive Oxygen Species in Podocyte Injury

1Department of Nephrology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China
2Department of Neurobiology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China

Received 10 June 2013; Revised 16 September 2013; Accepted 4 October 2013

Academic Editor: Maha Zaki Rizk

Copyright © 2013 Shan Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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