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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 846091, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/846091
Clinical Study

Button Battery Foreign Bodies in Children: Hazards, Management, and Recommendations

1Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria 21526, Egypt
2Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519, Egypt

Received 16 April 2013; Revised 16 June 2013; Accepted 18 June 2013

Academic Editor: David J. Yang

Copyright © 2013 Mohammed Hossam Thabet et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. The demand and usage of button batteries have risen. They are frequently inadvertently placed by children in their ears or noses and occasionally are swallowed and lodged along the upper aerodigestive tract. The purpose of this work is to study the different presentations of button battery foreign bodies and present our experience in the diagnosis and management of this hazardous problem in children. Patients and Methods. This study included 13 patients. The diagnostic protocol was comprised of a thorough history, head and neck physical examination, and appropriate radiographic evaluation. The button batteries were emergently extracted under general anesthesia. Results. The average follow-up period was 4.3 months. Five patients had a nasal button battery. Four patients had an esophageal button battery. Three patients had a button battery in the stomach. One patient had a button battery impacted in the left external ear canal. Apart from a nasal septal perforation and a tympanic membrane perforation, no major complications were detected. Conclusion. Early detection is the key in the management of button battery foreign bodies. They have a distinctive appearance on radiography, and its prompt removal is mandatory, especially for batteries lodged in the esophagus. Physicians must recognize the hazardous potential and serious implications of such an accident. There is a need for more public education about this serious problem.