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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 852093, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/852093
Review Article

Heparan Sulfate and Heparanase as Modulators of Breast Cancer Progression

1Programa de Glicobiologia, Instituto de Bioquímica de Médica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-590, Brazil
2Laboratório de Bioquímica e Biologia Celular de Glicoconjugados, Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, Rua Prof. Rodolpho P. Rocco No. 255, 4 andar, sala 4A-08, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-590, Brazil

Received 10 June 2013; Accepted 4 July 2013

Academic Editor: Davide Vigetti

Copyright © 2013 Angélica M. Gomes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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