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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 856265, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/856265
Review Article

Genome Diversification Mechanism of Rodent and Lagomorpha Chemokine Genes

1School of Health Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kuhonji, Kumamoto 860-0976, Japan
2Department of Molecular Enzymology, Kumamoto University, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan
3Department of Microbiology, Kinki University, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511, Japan
4Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kuhonji, Kumamoto 860-0976, Japan

Received 23 April 2013; Accepted 11 July 2013

Academic Editor: Sanford I. Bernstein

Copyright © 2013 Kanako Shibata et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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