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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 863240, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/863240
Review Article

Microbial Inoculants and Their Impact on Soil Microbial Communities: A Review

Laboratory of Legumes, Centre of Biotechnology of Borj-Cédria, P.O. Box 901, 2050 Hammam-Lif, Tunisia

Received 10 April 2013; Revised 7 June 2013; Accepted 25 June 2013

Academic Editor: Ameur Cherif

Copyright © 2013 Darine Trabelsi and Ridha Mhamdi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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