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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 867983, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/867983
Clinical Study

Variables Associated with Performance of an Active Limb Movement following Within-Session Instruction in People with and People without Low Back Pain

1Program in Physical Therapy, Saint Louis University, 3437 Caroline St., St. Louis, MO 63104, USA
2Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA
3Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
4Program in Physical Therapy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182, USA
5Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA

Received 11 April 2013; Revised 29 June 2013; Accepted 13 July 2013

Academic Editor: Joseph Hamill

Copyright © 2013 Sara A. Scholtes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Modification of a movement pattern can be beneficial in decreasing low back pain (LBP) symptoms. There is variability, however, in how well people are able to modify performance of a movement. What has not been identified is the factors that may affect a person’s ability to modify performance of a movement. We examined factors related to performance of active hip lateral rotation (HLR) following standardized instructions in people with and people without LBP. Data were collected during performance of HLR under 3 conditions: passive, active, and active instructed. In people with LBP, motion demonstrated during the passive condition ( , ), motion demonstrated during the active condition ( , ), and gender ( , ) were related to motion demonstrated during the active-instructed condition. Motion demonstrated during the passive condition explained 76% of the variance in motion demonstrated during the active-instructed condition. A similar relationship did not exist in people without LBP. The findings of the study suggest that it may be important to assess motion demonstrated during passive HLR to determine how difficult it will be for someone with LBP to modify the performance of HLR. Prognosis should be worst for those who display similar movement patterns during passive HLR and active-instructed HLR.