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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 901578, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/901578
Review Article

Translational Bioinformatics for Diagnostic and Prognostic Prediction of Prostate Cancer in the Next-Generation Sequencing Era

1Center for Systems Biology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
2School of Chemistry, Biology and Material Engineering, Suzhou University of Science and Technology, Suzhou 215011, China
3Department of Urology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004, China

Received 1 May 2013; Accepted 22 June 2013

Academic Editor: Xinghua Lu

Copyright © 2013 Jiajia Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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