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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 901740, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/901740
Clinical Study

No Association of IFNG+874T/A SNP and NOS2A-954G/C SNP Variants with Nitric Oxide Radical Serum Levels or Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in a Brazilian Population Subset

1Immunology and Immunogenetics Laboratory, Evandro Chagas Clinical Research Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Avenida Brasil 4365, Manguinhos, 21045-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2Department of Genetics and Southwest National Primate Research Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, 7620 NW Loop 410, 78227-5301 San Antonio, TX, USA
3Tuberculosis Clinical Laboratory, Evandro Chagas Clinical Research Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Avenida Brasil 4365, Manguinhos, 21045-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

Received 1 April 2013; Revised 5 June 2013; Accepted 5 July 2013

Academic Editor: Helder I. Nakaya

Copyright © 2013 Ana Cristina C. S. Leandro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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