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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 905043, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/905043
Review Article

Is There a Risk of Yellow Fever Virus Transmission in South Asian Countries with Hyperendemic Dengue?

1Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Saliyapura, Sri Lanka
2Tropical Disease Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Saliyapura, Sri Lanka
3Health Department, International Organization for Migration (IOM), Colombo, Sri Lanka

Received 19 September 2013; Revised 18 November 2013; Accepted 18 November 2013

Academic Editor: Jeffrey A. Frelinger

Copyright © 2013 Suneth B. Agampodi and Kolitha Wickramage. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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