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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 907170, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/907170
Research Article

Formation and Resuscitation of Viable but Nonculturable Salmonella typhi

1School of Life Sciences, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013, China
2Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Ministry of Education, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457, China

Received 25 September 2012; Revised 20 November 2012; Accepted 25 November 2012

Academic Editor: Brynn Levy

Copyright © 2013 Bin Zeng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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