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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 929531, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/929531
Review Article

The Roles of Hyaluronan/RHAMM/CD44 and Their Respective Interactions along the Insidious Pathways of Fibrosarcoma Progression

1Department of Histology-Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion, Greece
2Laboratory of Biochemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, 26110 Patras, Greece

Received 24 April 2013; Accepted 2 August 2013

Academic Editor: Achilleas D. Theocharis

Copyright © 2013 Dragana Nikitovic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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