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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 929842, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/929842
Review Article

From Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms to Constant Immunosuppression: Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Autoimmune Diseases

1Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
2Department of Pediatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA

Received 17 July 2013; Revised 20 September 2013; Accepted 20 September 2013

Academic Editor: Ken-ichi Isobe

Copyright © 2013 Raghavan Chinnadurai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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