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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 930713, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/930713
Review Article

Stem Cell Therapy in Bladder Dysfunction: Where Are We? And Where Do We Have to Go?

1Department of Urology, Soonchunhyang School of Medicine, Seoul 140-743, Republic of Korea
2National Primate Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Ochang 363-883, Republic of Korea
3Medical Research Institute, Chung-Ang School of Medicine, Seoul 156-756, Republic of Korea

Received 15 June 2013; Revised 7 August 2013; Accepted 7 August 2013

Academic Editor: Ken-ichi Isobe

Copyright © 2013 Jae Heon Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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