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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 942431, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/942431
Research Article

Depletion of Luminal Pyridine Nucleotides in the Endoplasmic Reticulum Activates Autophagy with the Involvement of mTOR Pathway

Department of Medical Chemistry, Molecular Biology and Pathobiochemistry, Semmelweis University, Tűzoltó utca 37-47, Budapest 1094, Hungary

Received 6 July 2013; Revised 3 October 2013; Accepted 7 October 2013

Academic Editor: Cristina Angeloni

Copyright © 2013 Orsolya Kapuy and Gábor Bánhegyi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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