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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 946206, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/946206
Review Article

Emerging Metabolic Targets in the Therapy of Hematological Malignancies

University of Bern, Department of Clinical Research, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Murtenstrasse 31, 3010 Bern, Switzerland

Received 24 April 2013; Revised 15 July 2013; Accepted 15 July 2013

Academic Editor: Beric Henderson

Copyright © 2013 Zaira Leni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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