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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 948258, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/948258
Review Article

Use of Frankia and Actinorhizal Plants for Degraded Lands Reclamation

1Laboratoire Mixte International Adaptation des Plantes et Microorganismes Associés aux Stress Environnementaux (LAPSE), 1386 Dakar, Senegal
2Laboratoire Commun de Microbiologie IRD/ISRA/UCAD, 1386 Dakar, Senegal
3Institute of Forest Genetics and Tree Breeding, Forest Campus, R. S. Puram, Coimbatore 641 002, India
4Département de Biologie Végétale, Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD), 5005 Dakar, Senegal
5Equipe Rhizogenèse, UMR DIADE, IRD, 911 Avenue Agropolis, 34394 Montpellier Cedex 5, France

Received 24 May 2013; Revised 23 September 2013; Accepted 25 September 2013

Academic Editor: Himanshu Garg

Copyright © 2013 Nathalie Diagne et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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