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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 953520, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/953520
Research Article

Effects of Nigella sativa and Lepidium sativum on Cyclosporine Pharmacokinetics

1Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University Riyadh, P.O. Box 2457, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University Riyadh, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
3Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University Riyadh, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
4Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University Riyadh, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia

Received 4 April 2013; Revised 3 June 2013; Accepted 18 June 2013

Academic Editor: Shigeru Satoh

Copyright © 2013 F. I. Al-Jenoobi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of Nigella sativa and Lepidium sativum on the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine in rabbits. Two groups of animals were treated separately with Nigella sativa (200 mg/kg p.o.) or Lepidium sativum (150 mg/kg p.o.) for eight consecutive days. On the 8th day, cyclosporine (30 mg/kg p.o.) was administered to each group one hour after herbal treatment. Blood samples were withdrawn at different time intervals (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, 12, and 24 hrs) from marginal ear vein. Cyclosporine was analyzed using UPLC/MS method. The coadministration of Nigella sativa significantly decreased the and of cyclosporine; the change was observed by 35.5% and 55.9%, respectively ( ). Lepidium sativum did not produce any significant change in of cyclosporine, although its absorption was significantly delayed compared with control group. A remarkable change was observed in and of Lepidium sativum treated group. Our findings suggest that concurrent consumption of Nigella sativa and Lepidium sativum could alter the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine at various levels.