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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 954060, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/954060
Research Article

Adaptation or Malignant Transformation: The Two Faces of Epigenetically Mediated Response to Stress

Department of Molecular Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac 102a, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia

Received 26 April 2013; Revised 26 August 2013; Accepted 29 August 2013

Academic Editor: Wolfgang Arthur Schulz

Copyright © 2013 Aleksandar Vojta and Vlatka Zoldoš. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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