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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 963525, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/963525
Review Article

Waterlogging Tolerance of Crops: Breeding, Mechanism of Tolerance, Molecular Approaches, and Future Prospects

1Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
2Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
3Bioscience and Agrotechnology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor, Malaysia
4Rice and Industrial Crop Research Centre, Malaysian Agriculture Research and Development Institute (MARDI), Locked Bag No 203, Kepala Batas Post Office, 13200 Seberang Perai, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia
5Plant Pathology Division, Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI), Gazipur, Dhaka, Bangladesh

Received 20 October 2012; Accepted 14 November 2012

Academic Editor: Andrei Surguchov

Copyright © 2013 F. Ahmed et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Submergence or flood is one of the major harmful abiotic stresses in the low-lying countries and crop losses due to waterlogging are considerably high. Plant breeding techniques, conventional or genetic engineering, might be an effective and economic way of developing crops to grow successfully in waterlogged condition. Marker assisted selection (MAS) is a new and more effective approach which can identify genomic regions of crops under stress, which could not be done previously. The discovery of comprehensive molecular linkage maps enables us to do the pyramiding of desirable traits to improve in submergence tolerance through MAS. However, because of genetic and environmental interaction, too many genes encoding a trait, and using undesirable populations the mapping of QTL was hampered to ensure proper growth and yield under waterlogged conditions Steady advances in the field of genomics and proteomics over the years will be helpful to increase the breeding programs which will help to accomplish a significant progress in the field crop variety development and also improvement in near future. Waterlogging response of soybean and major cereal crops, as rice, wheat, barley, and maize and discovery of QTL related with tolerance of waterlogging, development of resistant variety, and, in addition, future prospects have also been discussed.