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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 151726, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/151726
Research Article

Comparison of the Ventricle Muscle Proteome between Patients with Rheumatic Heart Disease and Controls with Mitral Valve Prolapse: HSP 60 May Be a Specific Protein in RHD

1Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital, Ningbo Medical Centre Lihuili Hospital, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315041, China
2Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310006, China

Received 2 December 2013; Revised 31 January 2014; Accepted 3 February 2014; Published 12 March 2014

Academic Editor: Anthony Gramolin

Copyright © 2014 Dawei Zheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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