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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 238485, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/238485
Review Article

Role of Methylglyoxal in Alzheimer’s Disease

1Department for Life Quality Studies, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Corso d’Augusto 237, 47900 Rimini, Italy
2Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, 40126 Bologna, Italy

Received 13 December 2013; Revised 28 January 2014; Accepted 30 January 2014; Published 9 March 2014

Academic Editor: Tullia Maraldi

Copyright © 2014 Cristina Angeloni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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