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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 273932, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/273932
Research Article

Fetus Sound Stimulation: Cilia Memristor Effect of Signal Transduction

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology “Narodni front”, Kraljice Natalije Street 62, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
2Belgrade University Medical School, Doktora Subotica Street 8, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
3Institute for Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Majke Jevrosime 8, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
4Institute for Experimental Phonetics and Speech Pathology, Gospodar Jovanova Street 35, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
5Life Activities Advancement Center, Gospodar Jovanova Street 35, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
6Biomedical engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije Street 8, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia

Received 24 November 2013; Revised 16 January 2014; Accepted 19 January 2014; Published 26 February 2014

Academic Editor: Irma Virant-Klun

Copyright © 2014 Svetlana Jankovic-Raznatovic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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