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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 307976, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/307976
Research Article

A Novel Homozygous Mutation in the EC1/EC2 Interaction Domain of the Gap Junction Complex Connexon 26 Leads to Profound Hearing Impairment

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Freiburg, Killianstraße 5, 79106 Freiburg, Germany

Received 29 April 2013; Revised 27 September 2013; Accepted 14 October 2013; Published 16 January 2014

Academic Editor: Brad Upham

Copyright © 2014 Ralf Birkenhäger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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