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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 520763, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/520763
Review Article

Toward Understanding the Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in the Immune System: Current Progress and Future Trends

Biological Sciences Department, King Faisal University, P.O. Box 380, Hofouf 31982, Saudi Arabia

Received 26 July 2013; Accepted 14 October 2013; Published 6 January 2014

Academic Editor: Silvia Gregori

Copyright © 2014 Hamza Hanieh. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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