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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 581256, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/581256
Review Article

Nigral Iron Elevation Is an Invariable Feature of Parkinson’s Disease and Is a Sufficient Cause of Neurodegeneration

The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Kenneth Myer Building at Genetics Lane on Royal Parade, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia

Received 30 April 2013; Accepted 28 October 2013; Published 16 January 2014

Academic Editor: Maha Zaki Rizk

Copyright © 2014 Scott Ayton and Peng Lei. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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