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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 702848, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/702848
Research Article

Meconium Indicators of Maternal Alcohol Abuse during Pregnancy and Association with Patient Characteristics

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Universitaetsstraß 21-23, 91054 Erlangen, Germany
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrß 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany
3Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6-10, 91054 Erlangen, Germany
4Institute of Legal Medicine, University Hospital Charité, Hittorfstraße 18, 14195 Berlin, Germany
5Lipidomix GmbH, Berliner Allee 261-269, 13088 Berlin, Germany

Received 12 January 2014; Revised 12 February 2014; Accepted 12 February 2014; Published 30 March 2014

Academic Editor: Gottfried E. Konecny

Copyright © 2014 Tamme W. Goecke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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