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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 847821, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/847821
Research Article

Effects of SCH-23390 in Combination with a Low Dose of 17β-Estradiol on Anxiety-Like Behavior in Ovariectomized Rats

Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, I. P. Pavlov Institute of Physiology of the Russian Academy of Science, 6 Emb. Makarova, Saint Petersburg 199034, Russia

Received 25 April 2013; Revised 29 December 2013; Accepted 19 January 2014; Published 23 February 2014

Academic Editor: George Perry

Copyright © 2014 Julia Fedotova. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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