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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 859871, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/859871
Review Article

Tumor Initiating Cells and Chemoresistance: Which Is the Best Strategy to Target Colon Cancer Stem Cells?

1Institute of Cellular Biology and Neurobiology, National Research Council, Via del Fosso di Fiorano 64, 00143 Rome, Italy
2Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, Gemelli Hospital, Largo Agostino Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome, Italy

Received 30 April 2013; Accepted 24 October 2013; Published 15 January 2014

Academic Editor: Dominic Fan

Copyright © 2014 Emanuela Paldino et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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