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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 242764, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/242764
Review Article

Ubiquitin-Mediated Regulation of Endocytosis by Proteins of the Arrestin Family

1Institut Jacques Monod, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7592, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75205 Paris, France
2Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, CSIC-UAM, Arturo Duperier, 4, 28029 Madrid, Spain

Received 1 June 2012; Accepted 28 July 2012

Academic Editor: Dmitry Karpov

Copyright © 2012 Michel Becuwe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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