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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 518437, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/518437
Research Article

Regulator of G-Protein Signaling 5 Reduces HeyA8 Ovarian Cancer Cell Proliferation and Extends Survival in a Murine Tumor Model

1Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Pharmacy South Building, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
2The University of Georgia Medical Partnership, 279 Williams Street, Athens, GA 30602, USA

Received 6 April 2012; Accepted 19 April 2012

Academic Editor: Rolf J. Craven

Copyright © 2012 Molly K. Altman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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