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Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 826862, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/826862
Clinical Study

White Matter Lesions Are Not Related to β-Amyloid Deposition in an Autopsy-Based Study

1Department of Neurology, Donders Centre for Neuroscience, Medical Centre, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands
2Department of Anatomy, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands
3Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands
4Department of Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands
5Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Donders Centre for Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Received 1 June 2011; Revised 6 September 2011; Accepted 15 September 2011

Academic Editor: Helen Lavretsky

Copyright © 2011 Loes C. A. Rutten-Jacobs et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Population-based studies have investigated the relation between β-amyloid levels in cerebrospinal fluid or plasma and white matter lesions (WMLs). However, these circulating levels of β-amyloid in cerebrospinal fluid or plasma may not reliably reflect the actual degree of amyloid present in the brain. Therefore, we investigated the relation between WMLs and β-amyloid plaques and amyloid angiopathy in brain tissue. WML on MRI or CT were rated in 28 nondemented patients whose neuroimaging was available prior to death. β-amyloid in plaques and arterioles were immunohistochemically stained and quantified in postmortem brain necropsies. WMLs were present in 43% of the total population. Both cortex and periventricular region showed no differences for β-amyloid deposition in either plaques or blood vessel walls in patients with WMLs compared to those without WMLs. Thus, our results indicate that there is no relation between the degree of WMLs and β-amyloid deposition in the brain.