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Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 873937, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/873937
Review Article

The Right to Move: A Multidisciplinary Lifespan Conceptual Framework

1Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, 426 Thompson St, Ann Arbor, MI 48106, USA
2Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, 1012 East Hall, 530 Church St, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
3Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 3208 G. G. Brown Laboratory, 2350 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Michigan, 300 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
5NuStep, Inc., 5111 Venture Dr, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
6Department of Communication Studies, University of Michigan, 105 South State St, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
7Consumer and Market Insights, Amway, 187 Monroe Ave NW, Grand Rapids, MI 49503, USA
8Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit, University of Michigan, 300 NIB, Room 6E18, Campus Box 5456, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
9Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, 2101 Commonwealth Blvd Ste C, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA
10University Center for the Development of Language and Literacy, University of Michigan, 1111 Catherine St, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
11Adidas Innovation Team, Adidas, 5055 N Greeley Ave, Portland, OR 97217, USA

Received 7 May 2012; Accepted 30 September 2012

Academic Editor: Jean Marie Robine

Copyright © 2012 Toni C. Antonucci et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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