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Cholesterol
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 176802, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/176802
Review Article

The Fruit Fly Drosophila melanogaster as a Model System to Study Cholesterol Metabolism and Homeostasis

1Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572, Japan
2Initiative for the Promotion of Young Scientists' Independent Research, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan

Received 15 October 2010; Accepted 4 January 2011

Academic Editor: Patrizia M. Tarugi

Copyright © 2011 Ryusuke Niwa and Yuko S. Niwa. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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