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Cholesterol
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 781643, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/781643
Review Article

Comparative Structures and Evolution of Vertebrate Carboxyl Ester Lipase (CEL) Genes and Proteins with a Major Role in Reverse Cholesterol Transport

1Department of Genetics, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78245-0549, USA
2Southwest National Primate Research Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78245-0549, USA
3School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111, Australia

Received 25 June 2011; Accepted 30 August 2011

Academic Editor: Akihiro Inazu

Copyright © 2011 Roger S. Holmes and Laura A. Cox. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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