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Cholesterol
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 896360, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/896360
Research Article

APOE and FABP2 Polymorphisms and History of Myocardial Infarction, Stroke, Diabetes, and Gallbladder Disease

1Karmanos Cancer Institute, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, 4100 John R. Street, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
2Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
4Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
5Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA

Received 24 February 2011; Revised 11 May 2011; Accepted 20 June 2011

Academic Editor: Bruce Griffin

Copyright © 2011 Ikuko Kato et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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