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Cholesterol
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 847849, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/847849
Review Article

MicroRNA Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism

Marc and Ruti Bell Vascular Biology and Disease Program, Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology, Departments of Medicine and Cell Biology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA

Received 24 April 2012; Accepted 29 June 2012

Academic Editor: Jean Davignon

Copyright © 2012 Noemi Rotllan and Carlos Fernández-Hernando. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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