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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 25487, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/25487
Review Article

fMRI Brain-Computer Interface: A Tool for Neuroscientific Research and Treatment

1Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioral Neurobiology, Eberhard-Karls-University of Tübingen, Tübingen, 72074, Germany
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, P.O. Box 21 69, Tübingen 72076, Germany
3Institute for Natural Language Processing, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart 70174, Germany
4National Institute of Health (NIH), NINDS, Human Cortical Physiology, Bethesda, MD 20892-1428, USA

Received 28 February 2007; Revised 2 August 2007; Accepted 18 September 2007

Academic Editor: Shangkai Gao

Copyright © 2007 Ranganatha Sitaram et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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