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Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 278531, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/278531
Hypothesis

Breaching the Blood-Brain Barrier as a Gate to Psychiatric Disorder

1Department of Psychiatry, Soroka University Medical Center; Zlotowski Center for Neuroscience, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel
2Department of Physiology and Neurosurgery, Soroka University Medical Center; Zlotowski Center for Neuroscience, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel

Received 2 April 2009; Accepted 4 July 2009

Academic Editor: Hari Manev

Copyright © 2009 Hadar Shalev et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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