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Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 461263, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/461263
Review Article

Elucidating the Complex Interactions between Stress and Epileptogenic Pathways

1Department of Integrative Biology, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3140, USA
2Institute of Neurophysiology, Charité University Medicine, 10117 Berlin, Germany
3Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité University Medicine, 10117 Berlin, Germany
4Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3140, USA

Received 13 November 2010; Accepted 22 January 2011

Academic Editor: Alon Friedman

Copyright © 2011 Aaron R. Friedman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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