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Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 482415, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/482415
Review Article

The Etiological Role of Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction in Seizure Disorders

1Department of Molecular Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, NB-20 LRI 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
2Department of Cell Biology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, NB-20 LRI 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
3Epilepsy Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, NB-20 LRI 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
4Division of Child Neurology, Carlo Besta Neurological Institute, 20133 Milan, Italy
5Cerebrovascular Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, NB-20 LRI 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA

Received 10 November 2010; Accepted 28 January 2011

Academic Editor: Alon Friedman

Copyright © 2011 Nicola Marchi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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