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Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 615829, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/615829
Hypothesis

The Blood-Brain Barrier and Microvascular Water Exchange in Alzheimer's Disease

1Department of Neurological Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA
2Department of Neurology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA
3Advanced Imaging Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA

Received 2 September 2010; Accepted 12 February 2011

Academic Editor: Daniela Kaufer

Copyright © 2011 Valerie C. Anderson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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