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Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 429108, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/429108
Research Article

Stroke and Disorders of Consciousness

1Department of Neurology, University Clinical Centre Tuzla, 75000 Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina
2Department of Anaesthesiology and Reanimatology, School of Medicine, University of Tuzla, 75000 Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Received 29 May 2012; Revised 31 July 2012; Accepted 3 August 2012

Academic Editor: Christian Humpel

Copyright © 2012 Zikrija Dostović et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. To determine the severity of stroke and mortality in relation to the type of disturbance of consciousness and outcome of patients with disorders of consciousness. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed 201 patients. Assessment of disorders of consciousness is performed by Glasgow Coma Scale (Teasdale and Jennet, 1974) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Anonymous, 2000). The severity of stroke was determined by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (Lyden et al., 2011). Results. Fifty-four patients had disorders of consciousness (26.9%). Patients with disorders of consciousness on admission ( 𝑃 < 0 . 0 0 1 ) and discharge ( 𝑃 = 0 . 0 0 3 ) had a more severe stroke than patients without disturbances of consciousness. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with disorders of consciousness ( 𝑃 = 0 . 0 0 0 1 ), and there was no difference in mortality in relation to the type of disturbance of consciousness. There is no statistically significant effect of specific predictors of survival in patients with disorders of consciousness. Conclusion. Patients with disorders of consciousness have a more severe stroke and higher mortality. There is no difference in mortality and severity of stroke between patients with quantitative and qualitative disorders of consciousness. There is no statistically significant effect of specific predictors of survival in patients with disorders of consciousness.