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Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 979185, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/979185
Research Article

Sex Differences in Associations of Depressive Symptoms with Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Metabolic Syndrome among African Americans

1Northwest HSR&D Center of Excellence, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, 1100 Olive Way, Suite 1400, Seattle, WA 98101, USA
2Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
3Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
4Health Services and Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
5National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
6Department of Psychology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
7Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Baltimore VA Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

Received 30 May 2013; Revised 7 August 2013; Accepted 8 August 2013

Academic Editor: Janusz K. Rybakowski

Copyright © 2013 Denise C. Cooper et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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