Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology http://www.hindawi.com The latest articles from Hindawi Publishing Corporation © 2014 , Hindawi Publishing Corporation . All rights reserved. Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase Levels in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke Mon, 18 Aug 2014 08:51:17 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2014/170626/ Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) levels, cerebrovascular risk factors, and distribution of cerebral infarct areas in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Patients and Methods. Sixty patients with AIS and 44 controls who had not cerebrovascular disease were included in the study. The patients were divided into four groups according to the location of the infarct area and evaluated as for GGT levels and the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HT), and hyperlipidemia (HL). Results. The frequency of DM, HT, and HL and gender distributions were similar. The mean GGT levels were significantly higher in patients with AIS and those with relatively larger areas of infarction (). Increased mean GGT levels were found in the subgroup with hypertension, higher LDL-cholesterol, and triglyceride levels among cases with AIS (). Conclusion. Higher GGT levels in AIS patients reinforce the relationship of GGT with inflammation and oxidative stress. The observation of higher GGT levels in patients with relatively larger areas of infarction is indicative of a positive correlation between increases in infarct areas and elevated GGT levels. Nurbanu Gurbuzer, Eren Gozke, and Zeliha Ayhan Basturk Copyright © 2014 Nurbanu Gurbuzer et al. All rights reserved. Prevalence of Psychiatric Morbidities in Acute Coronary Heart Disease Tue, 22 Jul 2014 06:56:00 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2014/407808/ Introduction. Psychiatric problems and stresses may deteriorate the prognosis of patients with IHD. So evaluating their frequency possibly will promote our perspective regarding their vital importance in the field of consultation-liaison psychiatry. Method and Materials. One hundred and one (101) patients with IHD were interviewed in CCU of a general hospital by a psychiatrist to find whether there was any relationship between cardiac events and psychiatric problems or stresses. Results. Cardiac events were significantly more prevalent among patients with both psychiatric problems and biological risk factors (). Also, the number of patients suffering from psychiatric problems was significantly more than cases without that (). There was a significant difference between male and female patients regarding the type of stress (). 79% of total stresses were experienced by patients who had as well psychiatric problems (). In addition, there was significantly more dysthymic disorder in the acute group of patients in comparison with major or minor depressive disorder in the chronic group (). Conclusion. The high prevalence of psychiatric problems and psychosocial stresses among patients with IHD deserves sufficient attention by clinicians for detection, monitoring, and management of them. Saeed Shoja shafti Copyright © 2014 Saeed Shoja shafti. All rights reserved. Duration of Type 2 Diabetes and Very Low Density Lipoprotein Levels Are Associated with Cognitive Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome Wed, 25 Jun 2014 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2014/656341/ Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is now recognized as an independent risk factor for accelerated cognitive decline and neurological conditions like Alzheimer’s disease. Less is known about the neurocognitive function of T2D patients with comorbid metabolic syndrome, despite their elevated risk for impairment. Computerized testing in 47 adults with T2D that met criteria for NCEP metabolic syndrome revealed that cognitive impairment was prevalent, including 13% in tests of memory, 50% in attention, and 35% in executive function. Partial correlations showed that longer duration of diabetes was associated with poorer performance on tests of basic attention (), working memory (), and executive function (). Strong associations between very low density lipoprotein and poor cognitive function also emerged, including tests of set shifting () and cognitive inhibition (). Findings suggest that patients with T2D that meet criteria for metabolic syndrome are at high risk for cognitive impairment. Prospective studies should look to replicate these findings and examine the possible neuroprotective effects of lipid-lowering medication in this population. Divya Yogi-Morren, Rachel Galioto, Sarah Elizabeth Strandjord, L. Kennedy, Pooja Manroa, John P. Kirwan, Sangeeta Kashyap, and John Gunstad Copyright © 2014 Divya Yogi-Morren et al. All rights reserved. Emotional Regulation and Depression: A Potential Mediator between Heart and Mind Sun, 22 Jun 2014 12:37:07 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2014/324374/ A narrative review of the major evidence concerning the relationship between emotional regulation and depression was conducted. The literature demonstrates a mediating role of emotional regulation in the development of depression and physical illness. Literature suggests in fact that the employment of adaptive emotional regulation strategies (e.g., reappraisal) causes a reduction of stress-elicited emotions leading to physical disorders. Conversely, dysfunctional emotional regulation strategies and, in particular, rumination and emotion suppression appear to be influential in the pathogenesis of depression and physiological disease. More specifically, the evidence suggests that depression and rumination affect both cognitive (e.g., impaired ability to process negative information) and neurobiological mechanisms (e.g., hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis overactivation and higher rates of cortisol production). Understanding the factors that govern the variety of health outcomes that different people experience following exposure to stress has important implications for the development of effective emotion-regulation interventional approaches (e.g., mindfulness-based therapy, emotion-focused therapy, and emotion regulation therapy). Angelo Compare, Cristina Zarbo, Edo Shonin, William Van Gordon, and Chiara Marconi Copyright © 2014 Angelo Compare et al. All rights reserved. Correlation between Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Cardiac Disease Severity Sun, 16 Feb 2014 15:31:11 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2014/631380/ Background. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is one of the most common respiratory disorders in humans. There is emerging evidence linking OSA to vascular disease, particularly hypertension. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that link OSA to cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation are not entirely understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) with coronary atherosclerotic disease (CAD). Methods. A questionnaire survey based on Berlin questionnaire and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was conducted among 406 patients to assess demographic data and the symptoms, such as excessive daytime sleepiness and snoring. Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Berlin questionnaire were completed by all of the patients. Venous blood samples were obtained for biochemical tests. Characteristics of coronary arteries were collected from angiographies’ reports. All patients were divided into two groups based on results from Berlin questionnaire: low risk patients for OSA and high risk patients for OSA. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 13. Results. Mean age of patients was . 212 (52.2%) patients were categorized as high risk group for apnea. Also, excessive daytime sleepiness was reported in 186 patients (45.8%). The severity of coronary artery involvement, daytime sleepiness, and electrocardiogram abnormalities was significantly higher in high risk patients for OSA compared with low risk patients. High risk patients had higher level of FBS and LDL and lower level of HDL cholesterol . Conclusion. Our study found a strong correlation between the number of stenotic vessels and OSA. Based on our findings, OSA can be a predisposing factor for cardiac diseases. Hamid Reza Javadi, Shabnam Jalilolghadr, Zohreh Yazdi, and Zeinab Rezaie Majd Copyright © 2014 Hamid Reza Javadi et al. All rights reserved. Risk of Mortality (Including Sudden Cardiac Death) and Major Cardiovascular Events in Atypical and Typical Antipsychotic Users: A Study with the General Practice Research Database Thu, 26 Dec 2013 10:33:18 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/247486/ Objective. Antipsychotics have been associated with increased cardiac events including mortality. This study assessed cardiac events including mortality among antipsychotic users relative to nonusers. Methods. The General Practice Research Database (GPRD) was used to identify antipsychotic users, matched general population controls, and psychiatric diseased nonusers. Outcomes included cardiac mortality, sudden cardiac death (SCD), all-cause mortality (excluding suicide), coronary heart disease (CHD), and ventricular arrhythmias (VA). Sensitivity analyses were conducted for age, dose, duration, antipsychotic type, and psychiatric disease. Results. 183,392 antipsychotic users (115,491 typical and 67,901 atypical), 544,726 general population controls, and 193,920 psychiatric nonusers were identified. Nonusers with schizophrenia, dementia, or bipolar disorder had increased risks of all-cause mortality compared to general population controls, while nonusers with major depression had comparable risks. Relative to psychiatric nonusers, the adjusted relative ratios (aRR) of all-cause mortality in antipsychotic users was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.64–1.87); cardiac mortality 1.72 (95% CI: 1.42–2.07); SCD primary definition 5.76 (95% CI: 2.90–11.45); SCD secondary definition 2.15 (95% CI: 1.64–2.81); CHD 1.16 (95% CI: 0.94–1.44); and VA 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.31). aRRs of the various outcomes were lower for atypical versus typical antipsychotics (all-cause mortality 0.83 (95% CI: 0.80–0.85); cardiac mortality 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82–0.97); and SCD secondary definition 0.76 (95% CI: 0.55–1.04). Conclusions. Antipsychotic users had an increased risk of cardiac mortality, all-cause mortality, and SCD compared to a psychiatric nonuser cohort. Tarita Murray-Thomas, Meghan E. Jones, Deven Patel, Elizabeth Brunner, Chetan C. Shatapathy, Stephen Motsko, and Tjeerd P. Van Staa Copyright © 2013 Tarita Murray-Thomas et al. All rights reserved. Effects of Age and Cardiovascular Disease on Selective Attention Wed, 25 Dec 2013 13:13:24 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/185385/ In order to study the effect of normal aging and cardiovascular disease on selective attention, a letter-identification task was proposed to younger and older healthy adults as well as patients with a recent myocardial infarction or a recent coronary artery bypass grafting. Participants had to detect either a big stimulus or a small one surrounded by flanking letters. The stimuli were displayed horizontally, either in the left (LVF) or in the right visual field (RVF). The interaction between the type of stimulus and the hemifield of presentation reached significance in all groups except in patients who underwent a coronary artery bypass. Only young normal adults showed the expected significant RVF advantage when detecting big stimuli and an LVF advantage when detecting small stimuli surrounded by flankers. In older control adults and in patients with myocardial infarction, the RVF advantage for the condition with selective attention vanished. In patients who underwent a coronary artery bypass, reaction times were increased and no hemispheric specialization for selective attention emerged. The results are discussed with regard to the hypothesis of a Hemispheric Asymmetry Reduction in Older Adults (HAROLD model) and to the presence of cognitive dysfunction consecutive to cardiovascular disease. Sylvie Chokron, Gérard Helft, and Céline Perez Copyright © 2013 Sylvie Chokron et al. All rights reserved. Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene Polymorphisms and Metabolic Measures in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Patients Taking Antipsychotics Sat, 21 Dec 2013 12:41:12 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/596945/ Atypical antipsychotics have become a common therapeutic option in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, these medications come with a high risk of metabolic side effects, particularly dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Therefore, identification of patients who are at increased risk for metabolic side effects is of great importance. The genetics of fatty acid metabolism is one area of research that may help identify such patients. Therefore, in this present study, we aimed to determine the effect of one commonly studied genetic polymorphism from both fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1) and FADS2 gene on a surrogate measure of insulin resistance and lipid levels in a metabolically high-risk population of patients largely exposed to atypical antipsychotics. This study used a cross-sectional design, fasting blood draws, and genetic analysis to investigate associations between polymorphisms, haplotypes, and metabolic measures. A total of 320 subjects with schizophrenia () or bipolar disorder () were included in this study. The mean age of the population was 42.5 years and 45% were male. A significant association between FADS1 and FADS2 haplotypes was found with insulin resistance while controlling for confounders. Further investigation is required to replicate this finding. Kyle J. Burghardt, Kristen N. Gardner, Joshua W. Johnson, and Vicki L. Ellingrod Copyright © 2013 Kyle J. Burghardt et al. All rights reserved. Cognitive Performance following Carotid Endarterectomy or Stenting in Asymptomatic Patients with Severe ICA Stenosis Sat, 21 Dec 2013 12:39:16 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/342571/ Background. Endarterectomy (CEA) or stenting (CAS) of a stenotic carotid artery is currently undertaken to reduce stroke risk. In addition removal of the arterial narrowing has been hypothesized to improve cerebral hemodynamics and provide benefits in cognitive functions, by supposedly resolving a “hypoperfusion” condition. Methods. In this study we sought to test whether resolution of a carotid stenosis is followed by measurable changes in cognitive functions in 22 subjects with “asymptomatic” stenosis. Results. A main finding of the study was the statistically significant pre-post difference observed in the performance of phonological verbal fluency and Rey’s 15-word immediate recall. Remarkably, there was a significant interaction between phonological verbal fluency performance and side of the carotid intervention, as the improvement in the verbal performance, a typical “lateralized” skill, was associated with resolution of the left carotid stenosis. Conclusion. The results reflect a substantial equivalence of the overall performance at the before- and after- CEA or CAS tests. In two domains, however, the postintervention performance resulted improved. The findings support the hypothesis that recanalization of a stenotic carotid could improve brain functions by resolving hypothetical “hypoperfusion” states, associated with the narrowing of the vessels. Livio Picchetto, Gianfranco Spalletta, Barbara Casolla, Claudia Cacciari, Michele Cavallari, Cristiano Fantozzi, Alessandro Ciuffoli, Maurizia Rasura, Francesca Imperiale, Giuliano Sette, Carlo Caltagirone, Maurizio Taurino, and Francesco Orzi Copyright © 2013 Livio Picchetto et al. All rights reserved. Risk of Mortality (including Sudden Cardiac Death) and Major Cardiovascular Events in Users of Olanzapine and Other Antipsychotics: A Study with the General Practice Research Database Sat, 14 Dec 2013 15:16:04 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/647476/ Objective. Assess risk of cardiac events and mortality among users of olanzapine and other antipsychotics relative to nonusers. Methods. The General Practice Research Database was used to identify cohorts of antipsychotic users and nonusers with psychiatric illness. Outcomes included cardiac mortality, sudden cardiac death (SCD), all-cause mortality (excluding suicide), coronary heart disease (CHD), and ventricular arrhythmias (VA). Results. 183,392 antipsychotic users (including 20,954 olanzapine users) and 193,920 psychiatric nonusers were identified. There was a significantly higher rate of cardiac mortality (adjusted RR [aRR]: 1.53, CI, 1.12–2.09) in olanzapine users relative to psychiatric nonusers, consistent with findings for both atypical and typical antipsychotics. Relative to psychiatric nonusers, no increased risk of all-cause mortality was observed among olanzapine users (aRR: 1.04, CI, 0.93–1.17), but elevated all-cause mortality risk was observed when compared to all antipsychotic users (aRR: 1.75, CI, 1.64–1.87). There was no increased risk of CHD or VA among olanzapine users relative to psychiatric nonusers, consistent with findings for atypical but not typical antipsychotics. SCD cases were uncommon. Conclusions. Use of antipsychotic agents was associated with increased risk of all-cause and cardiac mortality. Patients treated with olanzapine were found to be at increased risk of cardiac mortality versus psychiatric nonusers. Meghan E. Jones, Giedra Campbell, Deven Patel, Elizabeth Brunner, Chetan C. Shatapathy, Tarita Murray-Thomas, Tjeerd P. van Staa, and Stephen Motsko Copyright © 2013 Meghan E. Jones et al. All rights reserved. Combining Personality Traits with Traditional Risk Factors for Coronary Stenosis: An Artificial Neural Networks Solution in Patients with Computed Tomography Detected Coronary Artery Disease Thu, 03 Oct 2013 13:28:34 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/814967/ Background. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a complex, multifactorial disease in which personality seems to play a role but with no definition in combination with other risk factors. Objective. To explore the nonlinear and simultaneous pathways between traditional and personality traits risk factors and coronary stenosis by Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) data mining analysis. Method. Seventy-five subjects were examined for traditional cardiac risk factors and personality traits. Analyses were based on a new data mining method using a particular artificial adaptive system, the autocontractive map (AutoCM). Results. Several traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors (CRF) present significant relations with coronary artery plaque (CAP) presence or severity. Moreover, anger turns out to be the main factor of personality for CAP in connection with numbers of traditional risk factors. Hidden connection map showed that anger, hostility, and the Type D personality subscale social inhibition are the core factors related to the traditional cardiovascular risk factors (CRF) specifically by hypertension. Discussion. This study shows a nonlinear and simultaneous pathway between traditional risk factors and personality traits associated with coronary stenosis in CAD patients without history of cardiovascular disease. In particular, anger seems to be the main personality factor for CAP in addition to traditional risk factors. Angelo Compare, Enzo Grossi, Massimo Buscema, Cristina Zarbo, Xia Mao, Francesco Faletra, Elena Pasotti, Tiziano Moccetti, Paula M. C. Mommersteeg, and Angelo Auricchio Copyright © 2013 Angelo Compare et al. All rights reserved. Improvement of Processing Speed in Executive Function Immediately following an Increase in Cardiovascular Activity Wed, 25 Sep 2013 15:43:39 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/212767/ This study aims to identify the acute effects of physical exercise on specific cognitive functions immediately following an increase in cardiovascular activity. Stair-climbing exercise is used to increase the cardiovascular output of human subjects. The color-naming Stroop Test was used to identify the cognitive improvements in executive function with respect to processing speed and error rate. The study compared the Stroop results before and immediately after exercise and before and after nonexercise, as a control. The results show that there is a significant increase in processing speed and a reduction in errors immediately after less than 30 min of aerobic exercise. The improvements are greater for the incongruent than for the congruent color tests. This suggests that physical exercise induces a better performance in a task that requires resolving conflict (or interference) than a task that does not. There is no significant improvement for the nonexercise control trials. This demonstrates that an increase in cardiovascular activity has significant acute effects on improving the executive function that requires conflict resolution (for the incongruent color tests) immediately following aerobic exercise more than similar executive functions that do not require conflict resolution or involve the attention-inhibition process (for the congruent color tests). Nicoladie D. Tam Copyright © 2013 Nicoladie D. Tam. All rights reserved. Sex Differences in Associations of Depressive Symptoms with Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Metabolic Syndrome among African Americans Mon, 16 Sep 2013 08:15:29 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/979185/ Young to middle-aged women usually have notably lower rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than their male counterparts, but African American women lack this advantage. Their elevated CVD may be influenced by sex differences in associations between depressed mood and CVD risk factors. This cross-sectional study examined whether relations between scores on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale and a spectrum of CVD risk factors varied by sex among African Americans (; ages 30–64) from the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span (HANDLS) study. Sex-stratified multiple regressions and logistic regressions were conducted. Among women, CES-D scores correlated positively with systolic blood pressure and waist-to-hip ratio (), but inversely with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (). Women had twice the odds for metabolic syndrome if CES-D scores ≥16 and had a ≥14% increase in odds of hypertension, abdominal obesity, and low HDL-C with each 5-unit increase in CES-D scores. Among men, CES-D scores correlated positively with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (), and odds of hypertension increased by 21% with each 5-unit increase in CES-D scores. Depressive symptoms may promote premature CVD risk in African Americans, at least in part, via CVD risk factors and prevalent metabolic syndrome, particularly in African American women. Denise C. Cooper, Ranak B. Trivedi, Karin M. Nelson, Gayle E. Reiber, Alan B. Zonderman, Michele K. Evans, and Shari R. Waldstein Copyright © 2013 Denise C. Cooper et al. All rights reserved. Obesity in American Indian and Mexican American Men and Women: Associations with Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Autonomic Control Mon, 19 Aug 2013 11:44:41 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/680687/ Obesity is a serious public health problem, especially in some minority communities, and it has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. While obesity is a serious health concern in both American Indian and Mexican American populations, the relationship between obesity and cardiac autonomic control in these two populations is not well understood. The present study in a selected sample of American Indians and Mexican Americans assessed associations between obesity, blood pressure (BP), and cardiovascular autonomic control. Cardiovascular autonomic control, systolic and diastolic mean BP, and body mass index were obtained from one hundred thirty-two American Indian and Mexican American men and women who are literate in English and are residing legally in San Diego County. Men had a significant greater systolic and diastolic BP and were more likely to develop systolic prehypertension and hypertension than women. Obese participants showed greater mean heart rate (HR) and systolic and diastolic BP than nonobese participants. Obese men also exhibited greater cardiac sympathetic activity and lower cardiovagal control than obese women. These results suggest that obesity and gender differences in cardiovascular autonomic control may contribute to risk for cardiovascular disorders in this sample of American Indians and Mexican Americans. José R. Criado, David A. Gilder, Mary A. Kalafut, and Cindy L. Ehlers Copyright © 2013 José R. Criado et al. All rights reserved. Elevated Troponin Level with Negative Outcome Was Found in Ischemic Stroke Thu, 13 Jun 2013 09:28:58 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/953672/ Background. Troponin increment is a highly sensitive and specific marker of myocardial necrosis. The reason of high troponin levels in acute stroke is not clear. The aim of this study was to identify the relationships between cardiac troponin-I (cTnI) level and stroke. Methods. This study recruited 868 patients who were admitted to Istanbul Medeniyet University due to acute ischemic stroke, and the diagnosis was confirmed by diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. The patients with the causes increasing troponin level were excluded from the study. A total of 239 patients were finally included in the study. Clinics were evaluated by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Results. Serum level of troponin was higher in ischemic stroke patients with anterior circulation involvement in comparison to posterior involvement or hemorrhagic stroke (). Higher troponin levels related to increased stroke scale scores at discharge in ischemic stroke (). The level of cTnI was correlated with stroke scale scores at both admission and discharge in posterior stroke patients (). Conclusion. cTnI is a highly specific and sensitive marker of myocardial damage, and its elevation was associated with more severe neurological deficits in acute ischemic stroke. Buse Hasırcı, Münevver Okay, Dilek Ağırcan, and Abdulkadir Koçer Copyright © 2013 Buse Hasırcı et al. All rights reserved. A Systematic Review of Depression and Anxiety in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: The Mind-Heart Link Sat, 27 Apr 2013 13:05:19 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/159850/ Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most commonly seen arrhythmia in clinical practice. At present, few studies have been conducted centering on depression and anxiety in AF patients. Our aim in this systematic review is to use the relevant literature to (1) describe the prevalence of depression and anxiety in AF patients, (2) assess the impact that depression and anxiety have on illness perception in patients with AF, (3) provide evidence to support a hypothetical connection between the pathophysiology of AF and depression and anxiety, (4) evaluate the benefit of treatment of AF on depression and anxiety, and (5) give insight on medically managing a patient with AF and concomitant depression and anxiety. Dimpi Patel, Nathaniel D. Mc Conkey, Ryann Sohaney, Ashley Mc Neil, Andy Jedrzejczyk, and Luciana Armaganijan Copyright © 2013 Dimpi Patel et al. All rights reserved. Depression and Cardiac Disease: Epidemiology, Mechanisms, and Diagnosis Sun, 07 Apr 2013 16:59:37 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/695925/ In patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), depression is common, persistent, and associated with worse health-related quality of life, recurrent cardiac events, and mortality. Both physiological and behavioral factors—including endothelial dysfunction, platelet abnormalities, inflammation, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and reduced engagement in health-promoting activities—may link depression with adverse cardiac outcomes. Because of the potential impact of depression on quality of life and cardiac outcomes, the American Heart Association has recommended routine depression screening of all cardiac patients with the 2- and 9-item Patient Health Questionnaires. However, despite the availability of these easy-to-use screening tools and effective treatments, depression is underrecognized and undertreated in patients with CVD. In this paper, we review the literature on epidemiology, phenomenology, comorbid conditions, and risk factors for depression in cardiac disease. We outline the associations between depression and cardiac outcomes, as well as the mechanisms that may mediate these links. Finally, we discuss the evidence for and against routine depression screening in patients with CVD and make specific recommendations for when and how to assess for depression in this high-risk population. Jeff C. Huffman, Christopher M. Celano, Scott R. Beach, Shweta R. Motiwala, and James L. Januzzi Copyright © 2013 Jeff C. Huffman et al. All rights reserved. Adult Medication-Free Schizophrenic Patients Exhibit Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Wed, 27 Feb 2013 08:54:42 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/796462/ Deficiency in long-chain omega-3 (LCn − 3) fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n − 3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n − 3), has been implicated in the pathoetiology of cardiovascular disease, a primary cause of excess premature mortality in patients with schizophrenia (SZ). In the present study, we determined erythrocyte EPA + DHA levels in adult medication-free patients SZ () and age-matched healthy controls (). Erythrocyte EPA + DHA composition exhibited by SZ patients (3.5%) was significantly lower than healthy controls (4.5%, −22%, ). The majority of SZ patients (72%) exhibited EPA+DHA levels ≤4.0% compared with 37% of controls (Chi-square, ). In contrast, the omega-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4) (+9%, ) and the AA:EPA + DHA ratio (+28%, ) were significantly greater in SZ patients. Linoleic acid (18:2) was significantly lower (−12%, ) and the erythrocyte 20:3/18:2 ratio (an index of delta6-desaturase activity) was significantly elevated in SZ patients. Compared with same-gender controls, EPA + DHA composition was significantly lower in male (−19%, ) but not female (−13%, ) SZ patients, whereas the 20:3/18:2 ratio was significantly elevated in both male (+22%, ) and female (+22%, ) SZ patients. These results suggest that the majority of SZ patients exhibit low LCn − 3 fatty acid levels which may place them at increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Robert K. McNamara, Ronald Jandacek, Therese Rider, Patrick Tso, Yogesh Dwivedi, and Ghanshyam N. Pandey Copyright © 2013 Robert K. McNamara et al. All rights reserved. Apathy and Cognitive Test Performance in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Testing Mon, 21 Jan 2013 15:47:42 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/659589/ Background. Psychiatric comorbidity is common in patients with cardiovascular disease, with the literature indicating that this population may be at risk for apathy. The current study examined the prevalence of apathy in patients with cardiovascular disease and its relation to aspects of cognitive function. Methods. 123 participants from an outpatient cardiology clinic completed a brief neuropsychological battery, a cardiac stress test, and demographic information, medical history, and depression symptomatology self-report measures. Participants also completed the Apathy Evaluation Scale to quantify apathy. Results. These subjects reported limited levels of apathy and depression. Increased depressive symptomatology, history of heart attack, and metabolic equivalents were significantly correlated with apathy (). Partial correlations adjusting for these factors revealed significant correlations between behavioral apathy and a measure of executive function and the other apathy subscale with a measure of attention. Conclusion. Findings revealed that apathy was not prevalent in this sample though associated with medical variables. Apathy was largely unrelated to cognitive function. This pattern may be a result of the mild levels of cardiovascular disease and cognitive dysfunction in the current sample. Future studies in samples with severe cardiovascular disease or neuropsychological impairment may provide insight into these associations. Lynn Reese Kakos, Michael L. Alosco, Mary Beth Spitznagel, Joel Hughes, Jim Rosneck, and John Gunstad Copyright © 2013 Lynn Reese Kakos et al. All rights reserved. Higher Cortisol Predicts Less Improvement in Verbal Memory Performance after Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Wed, 16 Jan 2013 09:42:11 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/340342/ Objective. While physical activity can improve verbal memory performance in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD), there is large variability in response. Elevated cortisol production has been suggested to negatively affect verbal memory performance, yet cortisol concentrations have not been assessed as a predictor of response to exercise intervention in those with CAD. Methods. CAD patients participating in a one-year cardiac rehabilitation program were recruited. Memory was assessed with the California Verbal Learning Test second edition at baseline and one year. Cortisol was measured from a 20 mg, 3.0 cm hair sample collected at baseline. Results. In patients with CAD (, mean ± SD age = , 86% male), higher cortisol (hair cortisol concentrations ≥ 153.2 ng/g) significantly predicted less memory improvement (, ) when controlling for age (, ), gender (, ), maximal oxygen uptake (, ), and body mass index (, ). Conclusion. Prolonged hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis activation may interfere with exercise-related improvements in memory in CAD. Mahwesh Saleem, Nathan Herrmann, Walter Swardfager, Paul I. Oh, Prathiba Shammi, Gideon Koren, Stan Van Uum, Alexander Kiss, and Krista L. Lanctôt Copyright © 2013 Mahwesh Saleem et al. All rights reserved. Multiple Sclerosis and the Blood-Central Nervous System Barrier Tue, 15 Jan 2013 15:30:55 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2013/530356/ The central nervous system (CNS) is isolated from the blood system by a physical barrier that contains efflux transporters and catabolic enzymes. This blood-CNS barrier (BCNSB) plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). It binds and anchors activated leukocytes to permit their movement across the BCNSB and into the CNS. Once there, these immune cells target particular self-epitopes and initiate a cascade of neuroinflammation, which leads to the breakdown of the BCNSB and the formation of perivascular plaques, one of the hallmarks of MS. Immunomodulatory drugs for MS are either biologics or small molecules, with only the latter having the capacity to cross the BCNSB and thus have a propensity to cause CNS side effects. However, BCNSB penetration is a desirable feature of MS drugs that have molecular targets within the CNS. These are nabiximols and dalfampridine, which target cannabinoid receptors and potassium channels, respectively. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, present on endothelial cells of the BCNSB, also serves as a drug discovery target since it interacts with α4-β1-integrin on leucocytes. The MS drug natalizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against α4-β1-integrin, blocks this interaction and thus reduces the movement of immune cells into the CNS. This paper further elaborates on the role of the BCNSB in the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of MS. Alan M. Palmer Copyright © 2013 Alan M. Palmer. All rights reserved. Cardiovascular Risk Factors Promote Brain Hypoperfusion Leading to Cognitive Decline and Dementia Mon, 03 Dec 2012 11:29:54 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2012/367516/ Heart disease is the major leading cause of death and disability in the world. Mainly affecting the elderly population, heart disease and its main outcome, cardiovascular disease, have become an important risk factor in the development of cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This paper examines the evidence linking chronic brain hypoperfusion induced by a variety of cardiovascular deficits in the development of cognitive impairment preceding AD. The evidence indicates a strong association between AD and cardiovascular risk factors, including ApoE4, atrial fibrillation, thrombotic events, hypertension, hypotension, heart failure, high serum markers of inflammation, coronary artery disease, low cardiac index, and valvular pathology. In elderly people whose cerebral perfusion is already diminished by their advanced age, additional reduction of cerebral blood flow stemming from abnormalities in the heart-brain vascular loop ostensibly increases the probability of developing AD. Evidence also suggests that a neuronal energy crisis brought on by relentless brain hypoperfusion may be responsible for protein synthesis abnormalities that later result in the classic neurodegenerative lesions involving the formation of amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Insight into how cardiovascular risk factors can induce progressive cognitive impairment offers an enhanced understanding of the multifactorial pathophysiology characterizing AD and ways at preventing or managing the cardiovascular precursors of this dementia. Jack C. de la Torre Copyright © 2012 Jack C. de la Torre. All rights reserved. Are Cardiovascular Risk Factors Associated with Verbal Learning and Memory Impairment in Patients with Schizophrenia? A Cross-Sectional Study Mon, 19 Nov 2012 16:31:18 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2012/204043/ Objective. The aim of this study is to assess the relationships of cardiovascular risk factors with verbal learning and memory in patients with schizophrenia. Methods and Design. cross-sectional study. Inclusion Criteria. Diagnosis of schizophrenia according to the DSM-IV-TR criteria. Data Collection. Sociodemographic information, clinical characteristics, anthropometric measurements, blood tests, and episodic memory using the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT). Analysis. A multivariate analysis using multiple linear regressions was performed to determine variables that are potentially associated with verbal learning and memory. Results. One hundred and sixty-eight outpatients participated in our study. An association was found between the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and memory impairment on measures of verbal learning, and short- and long-term memory. Among the different components of MeTS, hypertriglycerides, abdominal obesity, and low HDL cholesterol were the only factors associated with memory impairment. Alcohol dependence or abuse was associated with a higher rate of forgetting. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that MetS and alcohol use may be linked with memory impairment in schizophrenia. These findings provide important insights into the interdependencies of cardiovascular risk factors and cognitive disorders and support novel strategies for treating and preventing cognitive disorders in patients with schizophrenia. Christophe Lancon, Daniel Dassa, Jessica Fernandez, Raphaelle Richieri, Romain Padovani, and Laurent Boyer Copyright © 2012 Christophe Lancon et al. All rights reserved. Cardiac Responses during Picture Viewing in Young Male Patients with Schizophrenia Sat, 10 Nov 2012 18:16:33 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2012/858562/ Previous research investigating the emotion recognition ability in patients with schizophrenia has mainly focused on the recognition of facial expressions. To broaden our understanding of emotional processes in patients with schizophrenia, this study aimed to investigate whether these patients experience and process other emotionally evocative stimuli differently from healthy participants. To investigate this, we measured the cardiac and subjective responses of 33 male patients (9 with and 24 without antipsychotic medication) and 40 male control subjects to emotion-eliciting pictures. Cardiac responses were chosen as an outcome measure because previous research has indicated that these are linked with attentional and emotional processes and provide a more objective measure than self-report measures alone. The differences in cardiac responses between patients and controls were limited to medicated patients: only the medicated patients showed significantly decreased cardiac orienting responses compared with control subjects, regardless of picture contents. These results indicate that medicated patients directed less attention towards emotion-eliciting pictures than controls. Decreased attentional resources while processing emotional evocative stimuli could lead to incorrect appraisals of the environment and may have detrimental emotional and social consequences, contributing to chronic stress levels and an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Roelie J. Hempel, Julian F. Thayer, Christian H. Röder, Hugo G. van Steenis, Nico J. M. van Beveren, and Joke H. M. Tulen Copyright © 2012 Roelie J. Hempel et al. All rights reserved. Smoking Cessation Intervention in a Cardiovascular Hospital Based Clinical Setting Sun, 14 Oct 2012 18:54:41 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2012/970108/ Introduction. Smoking is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally and it is a significant modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other chronic diseases. Efforts to encourage and support smokers to quit are critical to prevent premature smoking-associated morbidity and mortality. Hospital settings are seldom equipped to help patients to quit smoking thus missing out a valuable opportunity to support patients at risk of smoking complications. We report the impact of a smoking cessation clinic we have established in a tertiary care hospital setting to serve patients with CVD. Methods. Patients received behavioural and pharmacological treatments and were followed up for a minimum of 6 months (mean 541 days, SD 197 days). The main study outcome is ≥50% reduction in number of cigarettes smoked at followup. Results. One hundred and eighty-six patients completed ≥6 months followup. More than half of the patients (52.7%) achieved ≥50% smoking reduction at follow up. Establishment of a plan to quit smoking and use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) were significantly associated with smoking reduction at followup. Conclusions. A hospital-based smoking cessation clinic is a beneficial intervention to bring about smoking reduction in approximately half of the patients. Zainab Samaan, Barb Nowacki, Karleen Schulze, Patrick Magloire, and Sonia S. Anand Copyright © 2012 Zainab Samaan et al. All rights reserved. Takotsubo or Stress Cardiomyopathy Fri, 28 Sep 2012 11:45:29 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2012/637672/ Many case reports have been published of reversible left ventricular dysfunction precipitated by sudden emotional stress. We have evaluated 10 women hospitalized for acute chest pain and dyspnea, mimicking an acute coronary syndrome, after a severe emotional trigger. Those patients, postmenopausal women, presented ST segment alterations on the EKG, minor elevations of cardiac enzymes, and biomarkers levels. At the coronarography there was not coronary thrombosis or severe stenosis, but the ventriculography showed wall motion abnormalities involving the left ventricular apex and midventricle, in the absence of significant obstructive coronary disease. The course was benign without complication, with a full recovery of left ventricular function in some weeks. These observations, like other reports, demonstrate the impact of emotional stress on left ventricular function and the risk of cardiovascular disease. The cause of this cardiomyopathy is still unknown, and several mechanisms have been proposed: catecholamine myocardial damage, microvascular spasm, or neural mediated myocardial stunning. J. P. Bounhoure Copyright © 2012 J. P. Bounhoure. All rights reserved. Association of Ultrasonographic Parameters with Subclinical White-Matter Hyperintensities in Hypertensive Patients Wed, 26 Sep 2012 13:29:17 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2012/616572/ Background and Purpose. Cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are regarded as typical MRI expressions of small-vessel disease (SVD) and are common in hypertensive patients. Hypertension induces pathologic changes in macrocirculation and in microcirculation. Changes in microcirculation may lead to SVD of brain and consequently to hypertensive end-organ damage. This damage is regarded the result of interactions between the macrovascular and microvascular levels. We sought to investigate the association of cerebral WMHs with ultrasonographic parameters of cerebral macrocirculation evaluated by carotid duplex ultrasound (CDU) and transcranial doppler (TCD). Subjects and Methods. The study was prospective, cross-sectional and consecutive and included hypertensive patients with brain MRI with WMHs. Patients underwent CDU and TCD. The clinical variables recorded were demographic characteristics (age, gender, race) and vascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetic mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, current smoking, and body mass index). Excluded from the study were patients with history of clinical stroke (including lacunar stroke and hemorrhagic) or transient ischemic attack (either hemispheric or ocular), hemodynamically significant (>50%) extra- or intracranial stenosis, potential sources of cardioembolism, and absent transtemporal windows. WMHs were quantified with the use of a semiquantitative visual rating method. Ultrasound parameters investigated were (1) common carotid artery (CCA) diameter and intima-media thickness, (2) blood flow velocity in the CCA and internal carotid artery (ICA), and (3) blood flow velocity and pulsatility index of middle cerebral artery (MCA). Results. A total of 52 patients fulfilled the study inclusion criteria (mean age years, 54% men, median WMH-score: 20). The only two ultrasound parameters that were independently associated with WMH score in multivariate linear regression models adjusting for demographic characteristics and vascular risk factors were increased mean common carotid artery (CCA) diameter (, , , %) and increased middle cerebral artery pulsatility index (MCA-PI; , , , %). Among all ultrasound parameters the highest AUC (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve) were documented for MCA-PI (, 95% CI = 0.68−0.95, ) and mean CCA diameter (, 95% CI = 0.67−0.92, ). Conclusions. Our study showed that in hypertensive individuals with brain SVD the extent of structural changes in cerebral microcirculation as reflected by WMHs burden is associated with the following ultrasound parameters of cerebral macrocirculation: CCA diameter and MCA-PI. Ioannis Heliopoulos, Dimitrios Artemis, Konstantinos Vadikolias, Grigorios Tripsianis, Charitomeni Piperidou, and Georgios Tsivgoulis Copyright © 2012 Ioannis Heliopoulos et al. All rights reserved. The Clinical Features and Emotional Stressors in Korean Patients with Tako-Tsubo Cardiomyopathy Wed, 12 Sep 2012 13:20:13 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2012/843876/ Background. Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is typically triggered by an acute emotional or physical stress events. Aim of this study was to investigate the impact of emotional stressors on clinical features, laboratory parameters, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic findings in patients with TTC. Methods. Of 103 patients enrolled from the TTC registry database, fifteen patients had emotional triggers (E group), and 88 patients had physical triggers or no triggers (other group). Results. Most clinical presentations and in-hospital courses were similar between the groups. However, E group had higher prevalence of chest pain (87 versus 42 %, 𝑃=0.001), palpitation (27 versus 6%, 𝑃=0.008), whereas other group had higher prevalence of cardiogenic shock (35 versus 7%, 𝑃=0.027). E group had significantly higher corrected QT intervals (median, 477.5 versus 438 ms, 𝑃=0.001), and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (mean, 45.7 versus 39.6%, 𝑃=0.001), but lower hs-CRP (median, 0.1 versus 3.3 mg/L, 𝑃=0.001), CK-MB (median, 5.5 versus 11.9 ng/mL, 𝑃=0.047), troponin-I (median, 1.0 versus 3.2 ng/mL, 𝑃=0.011), and NT-proBNP levels (median, 2145 versus 4939 pg/mL, 𝑃=0.020). Other group required more frequent hemodynamic support and had significantly longer intensive care unit (median, 3 versus 1 days, 𝑃=0.005) and in-hospital (median, 17 versus 3 days, 𝑃=0.001) durations. Conclusion. The clinical features of TTC are different between groups with and without preceding emotional stressors. The TTC group with preceding emotional stressors was more likely to have preserved cardiovascular reserve and lesser likely to require hemodynamic support than other group although the entire prognosis of TTC is excellent regardless of triggering stressors. Bong Gun Song, Ju Hyeon Oh, Yong Hwan Park, Gu Hyun Kang, and Woo Jung Chun Copyright © 2012 Bong Gun Song et al. All rights reserved. Reduced Heart Rate Recovery Is Associated with Poorer Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Cardiovascular Disease Tue, 04 Sep 2012 14:21:19 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2012/392490/ Cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older adults has been associated with varying degrees of cognitive dysfunction. Several mechanisms may explain this association, including impaired cardiovascular reactivity to autonomic nervous system (ANS) signaling. Reduced heart rate recovery following a stress test may be considered an indication of impaired ANS function (i.e., reduced parasympathetic activity). Participants were 47 older adults (53–83 years) who underwent a treadmill stress test and were administered a comprehensive neuropsychological battery upon entry to phase II cardiac rehabilitation. Reduced parasympathetic activity was associated with impaired cognitive performance on a measure of global cognitive function and on tasks of speeded executive function and confrontation naming. These relationships suggest that changes in autonomic function may be mechanistically related to the impaired cognitive function prevalent in CVD patients. Therese A. Keary, Rachel Galioto, Joel Hughes, Donna Waechter, Mary Beth Spitznagel, James Rosneck, Richard Josephson, and John Gunstad Copyright © 2012 Therese A. Keary et al. All rights reserved. Stroke and Disorders of Consciousness Mon, 03 Sep 2012 11:48:03 +0000 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cpn/2012/429108/ Objectives. To determine the severity of stroke and mortality in relation to the type of disturbance of consciousness and outcome of patients with disorders of consciousness. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed 201 patients. Assessment of disorders of consciousness is performed by Glasgow Coma Scale (Teasdale and Jennet, 1974) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Anonymous, 2000). The severity of stroke was determined by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (Lyden et al., 2011). Results. Fifty-four patients had disorders of consciousness (26.9%). Patients with disorders of consciousness on admission (𝑃<0.001) and discharge (𝑃=0.003) had a more severe stroke than patients without disturbances of consciousness. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with disorders of consciousness (𝑃=0.0001), and there was no difference in mortality in relation to the type of disturbance of consciousness. There is no statistically significant effect of specific predictors of survival in patients with disorders of consciousness. Conclusion. Patients with disorders of consciousness have a more severe stroke and higher mortality. There is no difference in mortality and severity of stroke between patients with quantitative and qualitative disorders of consciousness. There is no statistically significant effect of specific predictors of survival in patients with disorders of consciousness. Zikrija Dostović, Dževdet Smajlović, Ernestina Dostović, and Omer Ć. Ibrahimagić Copyright © 2012 Zikrija Dostović et al. All rights reserved.