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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 134601, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/134601
Case Report

Murine Typhus: An Important Consideration for the Nonspecific Febrile Illness

1Division of General Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
2Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555, USA

Received 30 August 2012; Accepted 13 December 2012

Academic Editor: Hagen Sandholzer

Copyright © 2012 Gurjot Basra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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