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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 740603, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/740603
Case Report

A Case of Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Caused by Opioid Treatment for Nonmalignant Chronic Pain

1Department of Metabolic Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871, Japan
2Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871, Japan
3Department of Anesthesiology, Osaka Prefectural Medical Center for Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, Habikino 583-8588, Japan
4Pain Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871, Japan

Received 17 October 2012; Accepted 14 December 2012

Academic Editor: Gerald S. Supinski

Copyright © 2012 Yukiko Tabuchi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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