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Case Reports in Pediatrics
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 124838, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/124838
Case Report

Atrial Fibrillation and Long QT Syndrome Presenting in a 12-Year-Old Girl

1Department of Pediatrics, Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
2Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, H4/5 Clinical Science Center, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792, USA
3Division of Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, H6/5 Clinical Science Center, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792, USA

Received 30 June 2012; Accepted 2 October 2012

Academic Editors: J. Hruda, V. Krzelj, W. B. Moskowitz, P. Papoff, and A. Spalice

Copyright © 2012 Jonathan W. Knoche et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is rare in the pediatric population; however, there is increasing recognition that AF can be inherited. Long QT syndrome (LQTS), likewise, can be both acquired and inherited with mutations leading to abnormalities in cardiac ion channel function. Mutations in KCNQ1 are the most common cause of LQTS. Although rare, mutations in KCNQ1 also can cause familial AF. This report describes a child with a KCNQ1 missense mutation who uniquely expresses concomitant AF and LQTS. Due to the potential for increased morbidity and mortality, young patients who present with AF and a family history suggestive of inherited arrhythmias should trigger further investigation for LQTS and subsequent familial genetic counseling.