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Disease Markers
Volume 35 (2013), Issue 1, Pages 23–31
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/984845
Review Article

Biomarkers Predicting Antidepressant Treatment Response: How Can We Advance the Field?

Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Molecular Stress Physiology, Kraepelinstrasse 2-10, 80804 Munich, Germany

Received 1 April 2013; Accepted 19 April 2013

Academic Editor: Daniel Martins-de-Souza

Copyright © 2013 Christiana Labermaier et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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