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Dermatology Research and Practice
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 403908, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/403908
Review Article

Psychological Stress and the Cutaneous Immune Response: Roles of the HPA Axis and the Sympathetic Nervous System in Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis

1Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA
2Department of Medical Education, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA
3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA
4Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA

Received 11 May 2012; Revised 30 July 2012; Accepted 1 August 2012

Academic Editor: D. J. Tobin

Copyright © 2012 Jessica M. F. Hall et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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